In the July 2010 issue of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, Brandi Simonsen (University of Connecticut), Lisa Britton and Dale Young (Spectrum Center Schools) explored the use of school-wide positive behavior support in an alternative educational setting for students with severe challenging behaviors. These researchers found that there was some evidence that using the procedures being employed in typical schools to improve the expectations for the school, the staff and the students may have had a positive influence on reports of serious incidents in the school.

A Case for Expanding the Reach of School-Wide Positive Behavior Support

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. (September 15, 2010) – Controversy continues to swirl around the practice of educating students with significant disabilities in alternative educational settings. It has been argued that removing students from local schools because they present severe challenges should be avoided and instead resources and training should be provided for educators in typical classroom settings. Despite this goal, there remain typical schools that are unable to provide an appropriate education for students who test the limits of their efforts, and these students are sometimes placed in specially designed programs.

In the July 2010 issue of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, Brandi Simonsen (University of Connecticut), Lisa Britton and Dale Young (Spectrum Center Schools) explored the use of school-wide positive behavior support in an alternative educational setting for students with severe challenging behaviors. These researchers found that there was some evidence that using the procedures being employed in typical schools to improve the expectations for the school, the staff and the students may have had a positive influence on reports of serious incidents in the school.

According to Dr. Simonsen “This study illustrated the potential importance of a strong Tier 1 behavioral intervention, like school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS), in schools that serve students with significant behavioral challenges. In this study, the school already had Tier 3 plans in place for the majority of their students, but it was the addition of Tier 1 (and the alignment of Tiers 2 and 3 with Tier 1) that was associated with positive changes in student outcomes.”

About the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions

The Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions is the premier journal publishing research-based strategies for improving the lives of persons with severe behavior challenges. These approaches are used in homes, communities and in schools throughout the world. Regular features include empirical research; discussion, literature reviews, and conceptual papers; and programs, practices, and innovations. It is available electronically on SAGE Journals Online at jpbi.sagepub.com.

The article Abstract is available here.

Journal subscribers may view the full text of the article here.

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